Uganda Anti-Homosexuality Bill

In by admin

Uganda Anti-Homosexuality Bill

David Bahati (center), the author of the anti-homosexuality bill is blessed by Pastor Martin Ssempa (R), Sheikh Badruh (L), and other religious leaders who are fighting homosexuality at an anti-gay rally at Christianity Focus Centre in Kampala’s biggest slum, Kisenyi.
David Bahati, a Ugandan politician member of the ruling National Resistance Movement and MP in the Ugandan parliament, came to international attention in October 2009 after introducing the Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Bill as a Private Member’s Bill on 13 October proposing that a new offence be created in Uganda named “aggravated homosexuality” which would be punishable as a capital offence. The proposals included plans to introduce the death penalty for homosexuals who practiced gay sex with people under 18, with disabled people, when the accused party is HIV-positive. or for those previously convicted of homosexuality-related offences. The bill also includes provisions for Ugandans who engage in same-sex sexual relations outside of Uganda, asserting that they may be extradited for punishment back to Uganda, and includes penalties for individuals, companies, media organisations, or non-governmental organisations that support LGBT rights. Homosexuality is currently illegal in Uganda, as it is in many sub-Saharan African countries, punishable by incarceration in prison for up to 14 years. The proposed legislation was heavily influenced by American evangelical Christians. Bènèdicte Desrus/The Stand